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Tips for Flying Geese Blocks

This summer, the very talented and lovely, Amanda Herring, has been hosting a Friendship Quilt Along. This quilt along features a new quilt block each week, that teaches a new technique as well as focuses on a different attribute of Friendship. Amanda’s darling quilt is made from her darling Hello Lovely fabric collection*.

The finished quilt is this pretty 42″ x 42″ sampler-style quilt. You can download the free quilt pattern here.

In addition to the quilt pattern, you will need this package of 16 plastic templates available from the Fat Quarter Shop. The templates are very versatile and useful for lots of future quilting projects too!

The attribute for this week’s block is Loyalty and the block is made up of 4 flying geese triangle blocks. Amanda’s pattern has perfectly great instructions for making this 6″ x 12″ row of flying geese. Flying geese are some of my favorite motifs in quilting. I even have an entire Pinterest board of Flying Geese Quilts.

Because I love (and use!) this block so much, I thought it would be fun to show a few other options for making flying geese blocks!

One of my favorite methods is the no-waste method where you make 4 flying geese at once! For this method you start with a large square – that will be your “goose” (or triangle) fabric and four smaller squares that will be your “sky” (or background) fabric. It’s pretty slick! And you can customize this method to make flying geese in any size!

You can find the No-Waste Flying Geese method tutorial here + a free printable sheet for flying geese in multiple different sizes! You can also see how this method is perfect for making star points for other traditional quilt blocks!

Another fun method is using the Triangles On a Roll and foundation paper piecing. This method is perfect for making long rows of flying geese blocks as it will keep them accurate and perfectly straight. I also like it because I can make my rows of geese super scrappy.

Here is a tutorial for making Flying Geese blocks using Triangles on a Roll papers. (I used the finished 2″ x 4″ geese in this photo, but they are available in 1″ x 2″ and 3″ x 6″ sizes as well. You can find Triangle on a Roll Flying Geese paper here.*)

Be sure to check out Amanda’s blog for tips and tutorials that are part of the Friendship Quilt Along – including videos – as well as links to more people sewing along! Amanda is also giving out prizes along the way!

*This post contains affiliate links

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6 Comments

  • Reply
    Rike
    July 13, 2018 at 11:39 pm

    Thanks for the tips! I use the new Flying Geese ruler by creative grids. It’s just perfect and can be used for, I think, 6 or 8 different sizes.
    Greetings from Germany
    Rike

  • Reply
    Judith Blinkenberg
    July 14, 2018 at 11:47 am

    I can’t make themπŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚. I have tried the method you showed and they came out wonky. I tried the flip and sew, I tried the Fons and Porter ruler, and I tried the Doug Leko one. I want my geese with a generous 1/4” at the top and the many, many, I have made are just too short at the top. I want larger than a quarter. So I’m not doing block 6 of the Moda Block Heads 2. Your geese are beautiful. I have given up!

    • Reply
      Amy
      July 14, 2018 at 3:25 pm

      You’re definitely not alone! It’s so easy for Flying Geese to get wonky with diagonal seams. For what it’s worth, my only suggestion is to make them larger and then you have wiggle room to square them up. Also, if you ever need to make rows of flying geese paper-piecing or the triangles on a row are awesome for perfectly accurate FG!

  • Reply
    Blinkey
    July 14, 2018 at 3:26 pm

    I will get them!! Thank you!

  • Reply
    thesmittenchicken
    July 16, 2018 at 9:29 am

    I love your flying geese method! Sometimes I end up with an extra piece of fabric with a raw edge at the point! What am I doing wrong?

    • Reply
      Amy
      July 16, 2018 at 1:39 pm

      I have that happen too! I don’t know why – next time it happens I’ll try and deconstruct so I can figure out what’s going on…

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